City of Sydney Historical Association
COSHA
2nd March, 2013 - History of Surry Hills & Darlinghurst
9th February, 2013 - Chinese New Year
12th January, 2013 - Tour of St Barnabas Church, Broadway
8th December, 2012 - Colonial Land Use and the Coxes of Mulgoa Valley
7th November, 2012 - Guided Tour of the Town Hall Vaults
3rd November, 2012 - 1954 Royal Tour
13th October, 2012 - Rise of Sydney's Department Stores
14th July, 2012 - Life & Times of Tommy Townshend
9th June, 2012 - "Reynolds" Cottages
19th May, 2012 - St Paul's College Tour
14th April, 2012 - Motorised Mayhem
10th March, 2012 - The Flying Fruit Fly Circus
4th February, 2012 - Quong Tart: High Tea and Scottish Ditties
14th January 2012: Dictionary of Sydney
10th December 2011: Admiral Arthur Philip - The Man
12th November 2011: Glebe Walk
8th October 2011: Bob Carr at the Annual General Meeting
3rd September 2011: History Week
13th August 2011: Tom Wentworth Wills –Visionary Sportsman
9th July 2011: Henry L'Estrange - Funambulist and Aeronaut
11th June 2011: Afro-American Servicemen in WWII
14th May 2011: Government House Tour
9th April 2011: Amazing Stories from Randwick
19th March 2011: The Ones that Got Away
12 Feb 2011: Chinese Market Gardens of Sydney
8 Jan 2011: St Andews College Tour
11 Dec 2010: Garden Palace Scandal
13 Nov 2010: Cumberland Digs
9 Oct 2010: Painting the Rocks
4 Sep 2010: Celebrate History Week
14 Aug 2010: Whaling, Wool and Wealth
10 Jul 2010: The Ones that Got Away
12 Jun 10: Percy Lindsay
8 May 10: Sydney Tramway Museum
10 Apr 10: Making of our nation
13 Mar 10: Reading photographs
13 Feb 2010: Macquarie Place
9 Jan 10: Sydney's Astronomical History
12 Dec 09: The colony
14 Nov 09: Women of The Rocks
10 Oct 09: History of Kent Brewery
5 Sep 09: Scandal, Crime & Corruption
15 Aug 09: Walk-Darling Harbour
11 Jul 09: Redfern Alexandria & Waterloo
06 Jun 09: Pubs & Publicans of Sydney
09 May 09 : C19th Sydney Firemen
18 Apr 09 : History of Darling Harbour
14 Mar 09: Bewitched!
Annual General Meeting 2009
Jan 2009 - Trade Hall
12th November 2011: Glebe Walk


Saturday 12th November 2011

 

Historic Glebe Walk with historian Max Solling

On 12th November 2011 COSHA members took a guided tour around the Bishopthorpe and St Phillips precincts of historic Glebe. Our guide was local historian Max Solling who provided detailed histories of the area and its buildings. Then over afternoon tea in Max spoke to us about more recent history of community activity aimed at stopping freeway development as part of the broader “green ban” movement.

The following extract from Max’s talk on the area draws on his definitive book, “Grandeur and Grit. A History of Glebe”.

Localities within 2 to 4 kilometres of Sydney's CBD were Sydney's first suburbs, sharing narrow streets, back”lanes, a range of house sizes, and a diversity of domestic architecture. When architects wish to argue for the significance of a building they are inclined to locate it in a taxonomy of styles – Colonial, Georgian, Regency, Victorian Gothic, Italianate and Federation styles which, in Glebe, broadly correspond with the periods in which the suburb was built up

 

Glebe differed from other neighbourhoods on the city's urban perimeter to the extent that it was a grant to a single body, the Church of England which, after 1828, continued to retain ownership of a large tract, Bishopthorpe and St Phillips estate right up to 1974 when these lands were acquired by the Federal Government. The building up of Bishopthorpe between 1856 and about 1874 by a convenient device, the building lease, is interesting.

 

Many who took up the original leases were not builders at all but people recruited from themost unlikely sources - dairy workers, engravers, whip makers, greengrocers and newsagents. These people sub-contracted the work to specialist tradesmen. The Glebe Estate venture by the Federal Government was notable for the scale of the project (723 properties used as family dwellings & 27 commercial buildings), for retaining a tract of Glebe inhabited by largely low income families, and being the first example of government acquisition of property to rehabilitate rather than redevelop. As a consequence census material reveals that Glebe remains something of a social laboratory, a place divided into two worlds characterised by extremes - high and low levels of education, high wealth and high unemployment.

 

Glebe differed from other neighbourhoods on the city's urban perimeter to the extent that it was a grant to a single body, the Church of England which, after 1828, continued to retain ownership of a large tract, Bishopthorpe and St Phillips estate right up to 1974 when these lands were acquired by the Federal Government.

 

From about 1870 the terrace became the dominant building form in Glebe. The terraceprovided sufficient resources to accommodate rapidly growing populations, self-contained private housing space for an economy of outlay on land and building materials At the peak of the boom in 1885, forty two builders with local addresses were operating in Glebe. The inner suburbs of Sydney began as semi rural resorts of the well-to-do, and with a renewed appreciation of city life that transformation might be perceived as something like a returns to their origins.